How To Revise | 6 Step Method

09:38

Revision. We all have to do it at some point of our lives. Like I said in last weeks post, sharing 11 Revision Tips & Tricks, it is a pain in the bum. But now that exam season is right around the corner, the dreaded 'r' word is being said left, right and centre by parents, teachers, friends, yourself...

Revision - How to study effectively

There will be students who are well on their way with studying and there will be those that still have an untouched textbook somewhere in their room. I'm probably classed as somewhere in the middle - there's still quite a lot to do but hey, at least I've made a dent in the work. For me, that is pretty darn good to be at where I am, as I've never been the best at revision. In the past, I have usually started a little to late to be able to get a good amount of studying in. On top of that, I had no idea how to go about revising and would be all over the place; index cards one day, a half finished poster on the same topic the next day. 

But, this year, I have finally found a method that works for me. I get bored of doing the same thing over and over so by doing index cards, mind-maps, answering questions etc, I find it more enjoyable as I'm learning the information from different approaches. It may be best to find out what type of learner you are first, so that you are able to tweak the steps to suit you.

How to revise


Start big. Narrow the information down. Learn it. The blow it back up.

1. Write down a list of topics for each subject, then create branches off each topic and list the sub topics. Through doing this, you have a clear idea of what it is you need to know all in one place.

2. Go through the list and pick out areas that you find most difficult, don't know much about etc.. and focus on these first.

3. Create a poster, a powerpoint, a good set of notes (whatever your chosen method) for each subtopic.

4. Condense the information, from no 3, into index cards or a mind-map. It is probably best to do index cards as you can carry them around with you. But if you prefer a more visual piece, a mind map may work better. Or have both.

Index cards - A level Psychology

5. This should be a continuous step, just keep going over the information. For example, I like to flick through my index cards whilst walking to college or waiting for the kettle to boil instead of scrolling through instagram (but instagram still slips in there because breaks are important). I also like to have my mind-maps hung on my wall so that I can look at the whilst brushing my hair or getting dressed.

TIP - Imagine you are teaching your notes. Your family may think you have gone a little bonkers talking to yourself in your room, but actually saying the words out loud, rather than just in your head, helps you remember the information better.

A level revision mind maps psychology

6. Start answering questions from textbooks, doing past papers, writing out essays. This step should play alongside no 5 - continuously until the exam. This is an important part of revision as you are applying and putting into practice the knowledge you have learnt. At first, it may be a good idea to just take your time, but then gradually shorten the amount of time you spend on the task until you are doing it in timed conditions - so you are prepared for the exam.

A level Psychology Essays

How to revise - step by step list

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22 comments

  1. I always do spider diagrams to write out all my notes and then teach it to other people - teaching other people is actually the most effective way of learning! Great tips!

    The Velvet Black // UK Style & Beauty Blog

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    1. I agree, I've found it helps so much and thank you : )

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  2. I'm so glad I don't have to study anymore lol.
    Tegan xx - Permanent Procrastination

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  3. These tips are really helpful. Great post.

    LEJA

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    Replies
    1. Thank you glad you like them : )

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  4. Love your revision tips, im a uni student and find them all helpful x

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    1. Thank you, glad you find them helpful

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  5. Great tips! I should have used this when I was studying!

    Anika | www.anikamay.co.uk

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    Replies
    1. Thanks. Well at least you can use them for any future use haha

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  6. These are very thorough excellent revision methods! Thanks :)

    P.s have you seen my Inks box? See details here: https://everydayconcepts.wordpress.com/shop/

    Sarah
    https://everydayconcepts.wordpress.com/

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    1. Thank you and I'll have a look now : )

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  7. Love these great tips! :-)
    Cathy@threekidsandafish{dot}com

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  8. Great tips you have! And those are some intense mind maps and essays. :)

    X, Carina
    Running White Horses | Fashion + Travel

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you. Hahaha, I suppose having small handwriting does make it helpful for cramming information on things

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  9. I’m loving this! Pinned and tweeted. We appreciate you taking the time to party with us. I hope to see you on tonight at 7. Happy Monday! Lou Lou Girls

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    1. Thank you once again : )

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  10. These are great tips, Kathryn! I'm going to be studying again soon, so I will need to get back into the habit of revising. When I was in high school, I used to make revision summaries, put them into plastic sleeves, and hang them in the shower so I could revise while I was washing my hair haha :)

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    1. That's such a good idea! I'd definitely do that if I could see in the shower (short sighted problems haha). Thanks for stopping by : )

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  11. I love the tip to pretend you are teaching your notes! Such a smart study tip. Thanks for sharing!

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    1. You're welcome : ) If something helps, then just do it haha, thank you

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